Pet Cremation In Japan

People with pets dispose of their deceased animals' remains in different ways, but if they live in the city the options are obviously more limited. The relatives pick the bones out of the ashes and transfer them to the urn using large chopsticks or metal chopsticks, two relatives sometimes holding the same bone at the same time with their chopsticks (or, according to some sources, passing the bones from chopsticks to chopsticks).
But if the place is not yours, you can always ask the permission from the owner to do some digging to bury it. This is most recommended for those who have pets which might be the most common household dogs or cats that they feel most attached to so that they can show their proper respect for their favorite pet for the last time.



In a 2004 survey by a pet food company Japanese households gave the following reasons for keeping cats (percentage) : 1) cats are adorable (71.1 percent); 2) they like cats (70.3 percent); 3) cats are fun to be around (58.4 percent); 4) cats enrich daily lives (50.4 percent); 5) adopted a stray cat (36.1 percent; 6) cats are indispensable for family communication (35.7 percent).
Sometimes the animals get little exercise because the owners are also overweight and suffer from heart disease and high blood pressure. Cremation involves the incineration of the body in a specially-designed furnace, thus reducing the remains to ashes and tiny bone fragments (called "cremains").

In Japan, the practice has been popular for many years, with funeral parlors designed specifically for the cremation of pets. Home cremation is another option for pet parents in Japan. A typical Japanese grave is usually a family grave (墓, haka) consisting of a stone monument, with a place for flowers, incense, and water in front of the monument and a chamber or crypt underneath for the ashes.
From what I understand, AEON works with pet death-care businesses and cemeteries for pet parents, so they themselves feel cared for as well. Pet cremation services are usually divided into two categories — one for cremating multiple pet bodies at the same time, and the other an individual service to cremate one body.
Another option is to have a truck - equipped with an incinerator - make a trip to the pet owners' house, or some place nearby, for the funeral. JAPAN - With an increasing number of distraught pet lovers seeking to mark the passing of their cherished animal friends with a funeral service, the range of relevant services on offer has grown considerably.

ARK (Animal Refuge Kansai) and WANLIFE are two organizations that rescue abused pets and care and find new homes for them. Many people have goldfish, tropical fish and hamsters and turtles because dogs aren't allowed in apartments and people regard them as too much responsibility.
Browse 210 japanese cremation stock photos and images available, or start a new search to explore more stock photos and images. Naturally, ペット 霊園 more owners now feel impelled to carry out proper rites of mourning when their beloved pet has moved on to pastures new.

Pet owners either pay a lump-sum fee for use of the resting place for the bones of their pets, or they pay an annual maintenance fee. These sotoba may be erected shortly after death, and new ones may be added at certain memorial services. For an additional fee, this Japanese Chin cremation urn also includes your personal (4 line 100 character) inscription on a premium leaded brass nameplate.
At least three temples offer daily services, including a monk-led ceremony, cremation and sprinkling of ashes in rivers - the symbolic ritual of returning earthly remains to nature. Many of these new funeral homes are started by non-Japanese nationals. A surprising number of Japanese have ferrets for pets.

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